The writing is the part I like best.

Making the characters, designing the maps, all of that, is great.  But writing a dialogue sequence and having it play out before my eyes… That’s the best.

Yesterday I wrote a huge string of words.  Worked in a Dragon Quest in-joke, the works.  Then I deleted it all.

Total waste of time.

Part of it was that something about it read off.  Mainly, though, was that, once again, I was putting the cart before the horse.  What I want was a working game.  The story comes after that.  Not during.  After.gs-development-033

Thus the above sample of script.  The exchange is far from boss (more like entry-level employee about to be canned the first minute of his first shift) but it gets the job done.  It is place holder, nothing more.

Keep this in mind as we move to the next point of the post.

Plot wise, what has come before goes a little something like this:

heroOur Hero (whose name happens to be Hero) has accepted a job from the kingdom’s Chancellor to pick up some sort of item from a near (ish) ruin.  Because I like jokes only I laugh at, I’ve decided this item is called the Mack Gruff’in.  Hero believes this to be an awesome relic of the Old Times, because Hero can’t believe they’d hire him for something less than that.

On the way to the ruins, he runs into a wee problem: One of the guards refuses to let anyone through to the other side until he receives the wages his partner lost in the woods.  Hero, considering himself a Hero, decides he will enter the Mysterious Elven Forest of Mystery and save the day.  Not for pay or fame…  well, maybe for fame.  Getting the name out with the common folk helps the brand, right?

wizardHero does one more thing while he’s at it.  He ropes in the help of a Wizard (whose name happens to be Wizard.)  What he doesn’t know is that Wizard is also looking for the Mack Gruff’in, though for an entirely different reason.

Now up to this point, I’ve gone for expedience over anything else.  I’ve salvaged things from an earlier attempt at making a game.  While I created the characters afresh with RPGMaker MV’s Character Generator, these two characters are still characters I made earlier.  While I’m cobbling this plot together as I write this series, the seed comes from the same earlier game.  I wanna finish something so I have finished something.

Thus I pull up the map I have for the Elven Forest:gs-development-027

It’s a nice map.  It gives the Player places to explore.  It follows the geography of the world map (to a degree).  I really rather like it.

Too bad I can’t just used it like this.

Why?

Because it doesn’t fit the plot as I’ve written it.

It works fine in the earlier game attempt.  There it was just some place the Player had to pass through to get to the port.  It really didn’t matter in the grand scheme of things.

Now that I have an actual sub-quest for the place, it makes no sense.  Where does the thief hide?  Shouldn’t the path  between exits be more direct if it bears the name “Mysterious Elven Forest of Mystery?”  It really doesn’t make sense to me.

Now I’m not going to scrap it completely.  But what I’ve got planned is going to have to wait until tomorrow.  Today has had far more incidents in it that I planned.  But the basic thrust is this: I’ve scrapped one segment of work because I wanted things simple and now I’m “partially” scrapping another segment of work because basically too simple.

I’m really starting to like working on this project.

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One thought on “Goblinstomper! Developer Diary (VI): Mysterious Elven Forest of Mystery Part One

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